Protect the Protest Petition Law in NC

Fallonia Parker
Fallonia Parker 5 Comments
154 SignaturesGoal: 1,000

Petition To: Governor  Pat McCrory Rep. Thom Tillis, Speaker of the House Senator Phil Berger, President Pro Tempore, Senate What action is needed at this time: Please sign this petition to ask the NC Legislature to protect your rights as a homeowner and NOT to repeal the “Protest Petition” law. The Legislature is trying to finish their session this week so please sign and share with your contacts asap. Why is this important: If the Protest Petition option is repealed, homeowners will have no recourse to protect their own property rights from the potential negative impacts of new development.  


Every development proposal creates some community impacts such as more traffic, noise, stormwater runoff and so forth. A Protest Petition acknowledges that adjacent property owners are almost always impacted the most, and therefore should receive added protection. Although Protest Petitions are seldom used, their repeal will make it harder to promote quality growth that also protects property owners rights in existing neighborhoods across North Carolina. 
 
The Protest Petitions law, started in 1923, was designed to give homeowners a voice when new developments that require rezoning are planned adjacent to their properties. The Protest Petition is composed of the signatures of people who own at least 5 percent of a 100-foot buffer around the proposed development. When such a valid Protest Petition is filed, the proposed project requires approval of three quarters of the local board (City Council, Town Council). This is a state-wide law which affects homeowners in municipalities across NC. 

Please spread the word today before the bill is enacted. 

Sponsor

Community SCALE of Raleigh, North Carolina Community SCALE's mission is to preserve the character and integrity of Raleigh's diverse neighborhoods. Community SCALE will achieve its mission through leadership, education, advocacy, and the formation of creative partnerships to encourage development that, when it happens, respects the existing built environment, the natural environment, and the history of individual neighborhoods. 

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