Support Latinx Students Calling for a Better Princeton

Members of  the Princeton Latinx Community
Members of the Princeton Latinx Community 4 Comments
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Members of the Princeton Latinx* community have assembled to include the needs of Latinx students in the recent conversations about diversity and inclusion at Princeton University.

A town hall meeting was held on November 18, 2015 open to the Latinx community to share experiences and ideas for change.

Full text document with citations can be found here: "Latinx Students Calling for a Better Princeton."

The document covers the following

  • Representation on campus: Only 2% of full professors in 2014-15 are Hispanic/Latinx.
  • Latino Studies Program (LAO): since its inception in 2009, LAO has not offered a consistent slate of courses, making it difficult to take courses for students interested in the field or in receiving the certificate.
  • Lack of awareness and/or willingness to engage in conversations about identity, race/ethnicity, and privilege.
  • Representation on campus: Latinx Undergraduate enrollment has only increased from 7% to 9.2% in the past 10 years, including a drop between 2010-11 to 2012-13.
  • Lack of transparency about current University initiatives and efforts: those tasked with implementing the recommendations by the CPUC Task Force have not provided a progress update since September 2015.
  • Non-existence of a Latinx-centered space: students require a space to engage with our cultural heritage and a community that affirms our lived experiences while providing a safe and accepting place.
  • Lack of Latinx presence and history at Princeton.
  • Many Latinx students experience bias inside and outside of the classroom.
  • Redefining how Counseling and Psychological Services (CPS) serves students of color: seeking mental health resources is stigmatized within the Latinx community and many Princeton Latinx students have felt alienated and pushed away by counselors.
  • Supporting and improving the experience of undocumented students: many undocumented Princeton students identify as Latinx and have constantly been alienated by Princeton policies and procedures.
  • A Call for National Service for Education Reform in the United States


*We have members that encourage us to think about the issues that face those of us with a multitude of minority identities, including being female and/or queer. Out of a desire to be both inclusive and supportive of all members of our community we have shifted to using the “X” to replace the gender binary “a” for women and “o” for men typically used in Spanish. This encourages all of us to think of gender as part of a continuum in which some of us do not fit the societally established normative understanding of gender. Changing one letter gives people the language necessary to verbalize their identities and advocate for their equal standing in society.

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