Sign Petition

Expat Canadians deserve the right to vote in Federal Elections

653 Signatures Goal: 1,000

Allowing Canadian CITIZENS who have lived abroad for more than five years to vote in federal elections would be unfair to those who live in Canada, Ontario's top court ruled Monday.

In a split decision, the Court of Appeal overturned a ruling that had restored the right of more than one million long-term expats to vote.

If you disagree with this decision and believe that Canadian citizens living abroad deserve a voice in Canada with their vote please sign the petition and share with all!

10

Highlights

August 20
How is it that criminals in Canada are allowed to vote (since 2002), yet law abiding, expatriate Canadians who still very much care about their country, and what happens to it, are not? Voting is a right given by the Charter of Rights and Freedoms, Section 3 under "Democratic Rights: Every citizen of Canada has the right to vote in an election of members of the House of Commons or of a legislative assembly and to be qualified for membership therein." I am a Canadian citizen by birth and hold a Canadian passport. I should have the right to vote, regardless of where I reside in the world. The Charter makes no reference to residence - only citizenship.
August 18
The right to vote is "every" Canadians right.
August 18
This is an unfair rule. I'm Canadian an plan to return to Canada.
August 18
Canadian citizens deserve the right to vote in Canadian elections!
August 11
easier to read my opinion here https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/article/i-am-candian-rick-lewchuk/edit
August 7
Petition has reached 250 signatures!
August 7
First I'm designated a second-class citizen for being born (in Canada!) with dual citizenship, now I'm not allowed to vote? Outrageous. We cannot stand for this.
August 7
if they are Canadian they should have the right to vote
July 30
This petition has quickly gone around the world! Keep spreading the message! Email, share on Facebook and Twitter!
July 30
Citizenship equals voting rights. If you take those rights away you create a weak silent citizen. Then you can take away more rights? Shame on the government!

Is there a cause you really care about? Start a free petition like this one and make a real difference.

  • Catherine Torraville
    Catherine Torraville Canada, Halifax
    Aug 19, 2016
    Aug 19, 2016
    As a Canadian who has lived abroad for an extended period (but since repatriated), I know first hand that expats are often some of the most politically engaged individuals. The decisions of our government makes still have an immense impact; from the effects on our families, the use of our tax dollars, and sometimes our safety while living abroad.
  • Brent Hanniman
    Brent Hanniman Germany, Munich
    Aug 19, 2016
    Aug 19, 2016
    I have been out of the country for 8 years in october. All totaled, I spend a month on average in Canada each year on vacation and visiting family. My children who have been born abroad are canadian citizens and recent laws effected by the conservative government has made significant impact to the rights of their children. I am a proud Canadian, I always will be, regardless of how long I am away.
  • Garth Jay
    Garth Jay Switzerland, Genève
    Mar 14, 2016
    Mar 14, 2016
    ....please change this current injustice!! I spend three months a year in Canada, have real estate, have a daughter in a Canadian university, follow Canadian politics daily and am upset that I can't vote in my own country!!!!!!
  • Catherine Jay
    Catherine Jay United States, Brooklyn
    Mar 13, 2016
    Mar 13, 2016
    My name is Catherine and I am Canadian.

    Yes, I left Canada at the age of five. Yes, I have grown up in the USA, China, and Switzerland. Yes, I am currently attending university in the USA. However, that doesn’t change the fact that I am, and always will be, a proud Canadian. I sport my Canadian Olympic mittens, I go home to our cottage north of Toronto at least twice a year, I follow Canadian politics, I always have a Canadian flag on my wall, will do anything for a Timbit, and am easily identifiable by my Canadian accent. I have always considered myself a lucky third culture kid: I’ve grown up around the world, but I have an amazing country that feels like home.

    However, because I have lived outside the country for more than five years, I am denied the right to vote.

    I cannot tell you how frustrated and disappointed I was when, excited to vote for the very first time, I tried to apply for a ballot in absentia and was denied. I felt let down. After years of pushing friends and family to vote, I found myself in a strange sort of limbo: voiceless in my native country and powerless in the countries I live in temporarily.

    For years, I’ve chosen not to apply for American citizenship because I am proud of my Canadian heritage. I am proud of our diplomacy. Of our recent efforts to welcome Syrian refugees. Of our national health care. Of our stereotypical politeness. I love walking onto an Air Canada plane and listening to the bilingual announcements.

    However, I don’t want to live without a vote forever, without a way to influence the society in which I live.

    One might argue that, because I haven’t lived in Canada for fifteen years, I don’t have a vested interest in Canadian legislation and am not representative of the Canadian population. To me, that couldn’t be further from the truth. Aside from the fact that I am fortunate enough to spend three months of every year at our cottage, in identifying as Canadian I am also identifying with the programs and policies of our government. I regularly defend and explain our national health care system and discuss with my American peers the Canadian perspective on foreign affairs. I have also done my fair share of both breaking down stereotypes (Canada really is different from the USA, I don’t live in an igloo, and moose don’t walk the streets of Toronto) and furthering them (my Danish host mum couldn’t understand why I say ‘sorry’ and ‘please’ all the time and professors rue the day they mark me down for my Canadian spelling).

    Perhaps I’m not the quintessential Canadian young adult, but one of my Canadian ‘talking points’ is that we’re a salad bowl and not a mixing pot. Diversity among citizens is encouraged, maintained, and appreciated. I would have hoped that my international background would be similarly encouraged and appreciated in our political process.

    A fellow Barrie Colts hockey team fan summed it up perfectly when, after hearing our life story, he looked at my sisters and I and said, “You can take the girl out of the country, but you can’t take the country out of the girl”. And it’s true. No matter where my Mum’s job takes our family, Canada is home.
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653

Signatures

  • 1 month ago
    May United Kingdom
    1 month ago
  • 2 months ago
    Sarah United States
    2 months ago
  • 4 months ago
    Julia Kimura Japan
    4 months ago
  • 7 months ago
    Catherine Torraville Canada
    7 months ago
  • 7 months ago
    Brent Hanniman Germany
    7 months ago
  • 11 months ago
    Andrew MacKinnon Japan
    11 months ago
  • 1 year ago
    Garth Jay Switzerland
    1 year ago
  • 1 year ago
    Catherine Jay United States
    1 year ago
  • 1 year ago
    Ryan Alber United States
    1 year ago
  • 1 year ago
    Eric C United States
    1 year ago
  • 1 year ago
    Justin Wagg Germany
    1 year ago
  • 1 year ago
    Irena Lanc United States
    1 year ago
  • 1 year ago
    Trent Nelson Myanmar
    1 year ago
  • 1 year ago
    Danny Ellis Spain
    1 year ago
  • 1 year ago
    Anthony Conte Canada
    1 year ago
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