Jomo Williams for congress 15th district

JOMO WILLIAMS' acceptance speech: To the residents of Harlem 15th Congressional district; media; federal, state and local commission boards; esteem colleagues; ladies and gentlemen. My name is Jomo Williams, and I am a resident of Harlem New York. At present we the resident of Harlem are politically unstable; due to the fact that our current representative Mr.Charles Rangle was found guilty of many charges in violation of congressional ethic codes. These same charges have caused much public cry for his possible resignation or removal from office. Mr.Rangle, maintain his innocence and should be given the benefit of the doubt; because I myself personally know, how at times, our beautiful democratic system can be in error. But nonetheless, we the people of Harlem must prepare for the worst knowing that Mr. Charles Rangle may be removed from office. In that case a special election will be conducted by our governor of New York State, to replace the vacancy left by the Honorable Mr. Rangle. I myself have been pushed by many Harlem residents, asking that I run for representative for the 15th District of Congress; and I do accept their nomination. Thus I request that all of Harlem, and others, please give me a moment of your time to introduce myself and issues. I am 44 years old and was born, raise and still live in New York City, "the Big Apple". I am a Veteran of the United States Army and had attended John Jay College of Criminal justice. In the private sector I've worked in the Telecommunication and legal fields, and also had owned several businesses. One named Modern Technologies, which was located in Harlem on 141st between 8th & Edgecombe. Politically, I've been a loud advocate pushing many issues in interest of the average Harlem resident; and even wrongfully imprisoned in retaliation for my civil protests against official misconducts and wrongful killings of the late Mr.Diallo, and others. One of my last law proposal that I made to countless Judicial, legislative and executive officials on all Government levels was also handed to Brooklyn State Senator Hakeem Jeffries, Who had successfully carried it into law. That proposal of mines, which is now law, compels New York State, to count prisoners, for census purposes, as residents of the towns that they came from, and not as residents of the towns that they are presently imprisoned in. That same proposal had a nationwide effect as now the census Bureau, itself, had changed its own rules to allow all states to decide on their own if they want to count prisoners as residents of their home town rather than their place of imprisonment. Why is this new law important to my constituents of Harlem, and others? This new law corrects the dislocation counting of prisoners that had once caused the misappropriation of Governmental monies, resources, and political clout, to go elsewhere rather than Harlem and other urban areas Nationwide. Now we will have more appropriate monies, resources and representatives designated to our communities to help develop our neighborhoods and to better the reentry process when those same prisoners return home into our communities. One of my present law proposals is seeking to secure the right to vote for prisoners and parolees that are being denied to vote due to the injustices & discrimination that causes mostly minorities to be imprisoned in such gross disproportionate numbers in contrast to others. These discrimination and injustices are facts, that our country had admitted to doing and plead guilty to the United Nation of committing. These same social injustices should not be allowed to be used as a catalyst to deny votes. They deny our fellow country men & women, brother & sisters, the right to vote in violation of their 14th, 15, and 24th US Constitutional Amendments rights; Supreme Court case Hunter v. Underwood rights; and other rights. If given the right the vote this will empower those same persons, and their families & friends, to push issues and representatives of their interest to prevent social injustices, criminal justice system & corporate discrimination, urban under developments and poor schooling, and other issues of their interests. Many of the same persons that had nominated me had also express their concerns to me about the gentrification process that’s taking place in Harlem. Gentrification is process where a community's demographic population is being changed in advantage of one group over another's. Many Harlemnite, are being maliciously targeted for evictions, convictions, incarcerations, etc, that causes their removal from Harlem. These same removed Harlem residents are being replaced by other groups in vast numbers. There are numerous mechanisms and protections that could be proposed to safeguard Harlem residents from the wrongs from gentrification. Do not be misled, my fellow Harlemnites welcome the new diversity and improvements that had took over Harlem in the last several years. But on the same token, they want their fair share of the pie, and are very concern if they are the next in line on the gentrification chopping block. I will propose new law to work hand and hand with the new developers of Harlem, while simultaneously holding my fellow Harlem residents interests close inside my dear heart. Harlem, the time is now for you to chose a representative that holds your values and concerns sincerely, one from amongst yourselves. That’s why I humbly request for your support, contributions, and volunteer assistance in making me your next Congressional Representative. The time is now! I will like to close with a quote from our former mayor: ""Charlie Rangel is a giant," said former Mayor David Dinkins.”He's a man who has served not only the 15th Congressional District but this city. He's served this nation. There's nothing to be gained by seeking to further humiliate this great man." I thank you for your time and support. Happy Holidays; and God bless America.

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